Concrete-Working Equipment Category Winner

Heavy-duty Pavement Breaker (D25980K)

DeWalt

Designed to provide users with best-in class durability, performance, capacity and low vibration, the D25980K is equipped with metal, automotive-style seals on the ram and piston that help to prevent dust and debris from entering the unit, ensuring a longer life. The soft-start system allows the breaker to begin breaking as soon as the tool comes into contact with concrete, preventing the unit from “walking.” The D25980K is the hardest hitting electric breaker in the industry offering 61 foot-pounds of impact energy, 42-percent higher than its leading competitor, allowing it to handle thicker concrete than its competition. Engineered to provide users with 65-percent less vibration (at just 6.6 meters per second squared) than the leading competitor, the D25980K has a patent-pending SHOCKS -- Active Vibration Control system, which combines shock mounted rubber coated handles with along with a counter-balance mechanism.

RER: What makes the Heavy-duty Pavement Breaker (D25980K) innovative?

Eric Bernstein, director marketing of concrete, DeWalt: This new breaker is designed with innovative features and patented technology to provide end users with increased durability, performance, and low vibration. The DeWalt pavement breaker is equipped with metal, automotive-style seals on the ram and piston that help to prevent dust and debris from entering the unit, ensuring a longer life. The D25980K is the hardest hitting electric breaker in the industry offering 61 foot-pounds of impact energy, which is 42-percent higher than its leading competitor. This allows it to handle thicker concrete than its competition. Engineered to provide users with 65-percent less vibration than the leading competitor, the D25980K has patent-pending SHOCKS -- Active Vibration Control system. This system combines shock mounted rubber coated handles with a counter-balance mechanism for decreased vibration.

RER: What are the benefits to the Heavy-duty Pavement Breaker (D25980K)? How does the unit make jobs more effective and efficient for rental professionals and their contractor customers?

Bernstein: The pavement breaker was engineered to give the user the most comfortable breaking experience possible, DeWalt built the D25980K with a patent-pending SHOCKS - Active Vibration Control system. The SHOCKS - Active Vibration Control combines shock mounted rubber coated handles with a counter balance mechanism located in the barrel of the tool. These features dramatically reduce the amount of vibration felt by the user, increasing comfort and providing users with 65-percent less vibration than the leading competitor. The D25980K has a vibration measurement of just 6.6 meters per second squared.

Through end user research, DeWalt confirmed that durability is the number one feature professional contractors consider when purchasing a concrete breaker. In order to meet the needs of the end user and to provide a high level of durability, DeWalt equipped the D25980K with metal, automotive-style seals on the ram and piston that help to prevent dust and debris from entering the unit, ensuring a longer life. DeWalt has also engineered its barrel and tool-holder to be more robust than the leading competitor by putting more steel behind the bit.

To offer end users the highest-performing breaker, DeWalt designed the D25980K with a unique electronic control system, which provides the unit with a controlled start and constant speed under load. The soft-start system allows the breaker to begin breaking as soon as the tool comes into contact with concrete, preventing the unit from “walking.”

The D25980K also includes a hammer truck (D259803) that enables users to easily transport the breaker around the jobsite. This multi-purpose cart is the only one in the industry that allows the user to transport the breaker without having to remove the bit from the unit.

RER: Describe the development process of the Heavy-duty Pavement Breaker (D25980K). Where did the idea come from and who was responsible for its engineering and development?

Bernstein: DeWalt spent more than two years of field research to learn the needs and improvement opportunities of end-users, purchasing agents, service technicians, rental dealers, and industrial distribution. This was done in more than 20 cities in the U.S., 10 countries in Europe, and more than five countries in Latin America.

Product development and engineering was completed by our DeWalt Hammer Engineering Team in Idstein, Germany. Additionally, more than 1,000 tons of concrete was broken during testing of the final prototype to prove the durability of this breaker.